Unpopular Opinions: Marijuana For Good

When it comes to the fight against substance abuse, especially geared towards students and young people, many communities are still wasting precious time and resources trying to fight against the inevitable legalization of medical, and eventually recreational, marijuana. While hundreds of people die every day due to heroin and other opioid related overdoses, we know that no one has ever, in the history of the world, died from an overdose of marijuana.

That doesn’t mean like with every single drug and/or medication out there that there are not risks. True that driving under the influence of any substance, marijuana included, is dangerous and can cause serious injury and death to not only the driver and passengers, but other innocent people on the road. It is true that we don’t fully understand the impact marijuana has on the growing and developing brain and body, so keeping individuals under the age of 18 from using this substance isn’t a bad idea. I certainly don’t object to efforts to keep kids from experimenting with marijuana until they are of legal age, just like we do with alcohol.

Fighting to keep marijuana illegal, whether it’s medical or recreational, is a complete waste of resources and it is a fight that will not be won by opponents of legalization.

Marijuana is one of the oldest, if not the oldest, mood and mind altering substances in the world. It has been used by humans for thousands of years for both medical and recreational purposes. We know that it is not a drug that causes fatalities. We know that less than ten percent of users develop an addiction to the drug, which is characterized not by regular use but by any negative consequences associated with that use. Smoking weed everyday, just like drinking a glass of wine everyday, does not make one an addict. Being unable to go to work or school because of the consumption of the substance, or financial issues resulting from money spent on the substance, or the ability to live a functional life due to the substance would indicate a possible addiction. This is extremely rare when we talk about marijuana, just like with alcoholic beverages. Many people consume alcohol on a regular basis, with about 70% of Americans reporting drinking within the past year.

However, just like with marijuana, less than 10% of individuals who drink have a problem with alcohol consumption.

So why is marijuana illegal while alcohol is not? Many people believe that it goes back to industries that lobbied to make hemp illegal because it would be a more cost effective alternative to their products. Hemp is an incredible resource that can be made into paper, textiles, and hundreds of other everyday products, so other industries vilified the drug itself to prevent it from harming their business and bottom lines. Other reasons trace back to early immigrants who used the drug, so just as we do today, the white people vilified the drug because it was linked to brown immigrants who they considered dirty, lazy, and undesirable. We are all familiar with the prohibition of alcohol, and the propaganda used against it. It has been much the same with the prohibition of marijuana.

Many people in the treatment industry believe that if one is sober, that they need to abstain from every mind altering substance out there. This is the way promoted by Twelve Step fellowships, and consequentially this is the philosophy held by the majority of those who work or live in recovery. Just like each person gets recovery in their own way, the parameters of what recovery means can be different for different people. Many people in recovery from drug use are able to drink alcohol without consequence, and the same is true of casual use of marijuana. It is up to each of us as individuals to decide what recovery means to us.

When it comes to opiates, marijuana has been used for decades, probably even longer, to help with the withdrawal effects. Historically, people who couldn’t afford to get on methadone or receive other kinds of treatment have turned to marijuana to help with both acute and post acute withdrawal. Many people use it just like methadone or Suboxone, as an unofficial maintenance program to help them cope with the long, years long process, of staying off opiates. If we can treat opiate dependence with marijuana instead of other opiates, then why shouldn’t we? Isn’t it a better alternative than staying dependent on methadone or Suboxone for years on end? Some states get this, and are trying to move forward with “marijuana maintenance” programs for those addicted to opiates.

In the same vein, isn’t it better to prescribe marijuana for various medical conditions than the alternative of prescribing dangerous opiates and benzodiazepines? The dependence and side effects of these drugs are so dangerous and even deadly, while the alternative of using marijuana is much safer. I’d rather see a chronic pain patient smoking weed or using CBD’s to treat their condition that spending their life dependent on an ever increasing dose of oxycodone.

We’ve all seen the videos online of people having seizures, or episodes of indescribable pain, and using marijuana almost instantly reverses the symptoms. It is inhumane to allow people, especially children, to suffer from pain, discomfort, or crippling anxiety when we have a drug that can be used to treat it with little to no side effects. There are countless strains of marijuana that can be used for all kinds of issues. Each strain has a unique set of traits that can be applied to almost any illness or condition.

Legalization would provide an incredible amount of tax revenue to our communities. It could solve a great deal of budget issues. Furthermore, it would drastically reduce the number of people that are incarcerated for possession or sale of marijuana. It would put a significant dent in our prison overcrowding problems. It would significantly lessen the traffic through our courts and drastically reduce the number of people who participate in diversion programs and who are on probation. It would lower the number of children who are placed into foster care, and parents who are trapped in DCF programs, simply because they use marijuana. This is basically the equivalent of taking the children of parents who drink alcohol, and since most adults in this country drink, everyone should be able to see how ridiculous this policy is.

When opponents of marijuana are asked to explain their argument, they have nothing but junk science and skewed studies to support their position. Marijuana is no more dangerous than alcohol, and in all honestly probably less so. We are spending copious amounts of money to keep this drug illegal. We have to pay police, prosecutors, public defenders, advocates, court employees, treatment centers who run diversion programs, and an endless list of people and agencies. It costs a lot of money to keep this drug illegal, while legalizing it would actually GENERATE money. Dispensaries could bring jobs to our communities. Imagine the research that could get done on so many different diseases and medical conditions once we work to eliminate the stigma associated with marijuana.

Marijuana is just as valid of a medication as pain killing opioids, with a fraction of the risks associated with them. It is also just as safe of a recreational drug as alcohol, if not more so. The health risks are really in the ingestion method, which is typically smoking. However, using cannabinoids and marijuana itself in other ingestion methods would eliminate this one potential danger. We can do better when it comes to the ways we treat many different diseases and conditions, including the terrible issue we have with opioid dependent individuals. We need to focus our energies on the prevention of dangerous drug use, like that of opiates, and stop wasting our time and other resources fighting something that just isn’t worth the battle.

Rather than a danger to those in recovery, marijuana could be, and to many people already is and has always been, a blessing.

©Copyright 2017 In Angel’s Arms and Lauren Goodkin

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