Recovering Slow Turkey

I was watching tv the other day when I saw a commercial for a medication used to help people quit smoking. The ad was a play on the old “cold turkey” method, and advocated instead for the use of their medication to quit “slow turkey” instead.

We often hear it takes 29 days to make a habit, or that change doesn’t happen overnight. So, it got me thinking, why do we expect substance users to change their behavior in an instant?

We expect those with substance use disorder (SUD), which is the appropriate terminology in today’s language, to enter treatment and stop using substances on the same day. This thinking is asinine, and it makes no practical sense for the average substance user.

Using is not just part of our day, it’s the entirety of our lives.

Using and finding ways and means to get more encompasses every minute of our waking hours, and even some of our sleeping hours, too. I can’t tell you how many times I went to sleep with no plan for the next day’s use, and woke up the next morning with a plan in my head that my brain worked on while I was asleep. Using is everything to us, and it takes up the vast majority of our time. For most of us, we can’t just stop using on a dime and jump into recovery with both feet.

Why is it that when it comes to smoking, people understand medication assisted treatment? People understand that ANYTHING is better than smoking. If someone wanted to wear the nicotine patch, or take that medication from that commercial to quit smoking, no one would hold that against them. Even if they had to use those methods for YEARS, maybe even the rest of their life, nobody could possibly say that they would rather see their loved one still smoking. We want someone who smokes to do anything in their power to quit and stay quit, even if it means using a nicotine replacement therapy like the patch or gum.

Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) for opioid use is the same principle. It’s a medication that assists the person with substance use disorder in finding a way to let go of their illicit use. These therapies use opioid and partial opioid agonists to bind to the receptors in the brain where heroin used to bind. It tricks the brain into thinking it has what it wants, so the brain and body no longer crave the drug with such severity and frequency. It allows the brain to repair slowly over a very long period of time. For some people, they are able to continually lower that dose and eventually get off of MAT. For others, the cravings are too severe because their use was too severe. They may need to stay on MAT for the rest of their lives.

The question is, why does anyone care?

If someone is no longer waking up every day with their entire existence focused on using, then who cares if they’re on MAT? If they can hold down a job, pay their rent, raise their family, then who cares if they’re on MAT? If they have changed their lives so completely and become a productive member of society, then who cares if they’re on MAT?

I see people saying they don’t agree with MAT and I ask myself the same question every time: Why is it any of your business how someone else chooses to recover? Why are you judging someone else’s path?

I have no shame about being on methadone and if you are too, then you shouldn’t either. My addiction was so severe that there were no other options for me. I didn’t have time to keep trying the natural way, the twelve step way, the inpatient way. I was going to die if I kept trying to treat my medical brain disease without a medical treatment.

My recovery is as slow turkey as it gets. I’m not in any rush to get off medication assisted treatment. Why? Because IT WORKS. Methadone is the most effective treatment for opioid use disorder by leaps and bounds over any other method. I don’t know about you, but I’m betting on the winning horse. I’m betting on science. I’m betting on what has worked for me and millions of others. Actually, forget the winning horse. I’m betting on the slow turkey.

©Copyright 2019 In Angel’s Arms and Lauren Goodkin

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